Tag Archives: punk rock

017. Fucked Up Once Again: Flipper, May 1983

Gone Fishin Cover Flipper
I do not have a ticket for this gig.  Instead, here is the cover of their second album, 1984’s Gone Fishin’, featuring a cut out their famed Flipper Touring Van on the cover.  The side of the van reads “Flipper suffer for their music, now it’s your turn.”  MZ rode with the band in this very van, and describes the “delightful” exprience below.

017. Fucked Up Once Again: Flipper, Fryfogle’s, London, Ontario, Canada, May 1983, $n/a, with Guest Contributor M. Zeppelin.

You know, I never much cared for Flipper. I’m not talking about TV’s slimy, lovable SuperDolphin from the ‘60s but instead the confrontational, contrarian refuseniks that rose from San Francisco’s late ‘70s punk scene. Continue reading

007. Here Today, Gone Tomorrow: The Ramones with The Demics, May 20, 1980

I do not have my ticket stub for this show.  In its place, here is a handbill for the concert, forwarded to me by a friend, gleaned from somewhere on the internet.  These handbills were plastered all over downtown London for weeks prior to this much-anticipated gig.

007. Here Today, Gone Tomorrow: The Ramones with The Demics, Centennial Hall, London, Ontario, Canada, Tuesday May 20, 1980, $7.

In my previous piece on The Boomtown Rats’ gig from March 1980, I discussed how time and hindsight afford one a contextual luxury that is impossible to posses during any particular era’s here and now.  This 1980 Ramones concert, with returning locals the Demics as opening act, is a perfect case in point.  At the time, I simply enjoyed this night out as one pretty thrilling concert, but in retrospect I see it as being part of each artists’ aspirational home stretch.  It felt like a new beginning in a season of anticipated triumph, but it was really one of the last moments of a closing door. Continue reading

005. What’s In the City: NFG’s Second Annual Halloween Bash with The Regulators and The Sinners, November 2, 1979

Looking suspiciously like a business card, this is the only ticket that I have for a show from this period featuring a number of local acts that I would go and see live, back in the day.

005. What’s In the City: NFG’s Second Annual Halloween Bash with The Regulators and The Sinners, The Polish Hall, London, Ontario, Canada, Friday November 2, 1979, $3.

For those who have been reading my series so far, the marquee names that appear above must be engendering some serious head scratching. Who?? Continue reading

004. This Is the Modern World: The Jam, April 10, 1979

This size of ticket is similar to common contemporary standards. Canadian readers of a certain vintage will recognize the logo for the Dominion grocery chain—a capital D inset with a maple leaf—watermarked into the background.

004. This Is the Modern World: The Jam, Rex Danforth Theatre, Toronto, Ontario, Canada, Tuesday April 10, 1979, $7.50.

That feeling, that something I had hoped to find at the Elvis Costello concert—well, I found it here. This was a killer show. The Jam were burning with passion and, with sharp rapidity, they delivered one of the tightest sets I’ve seen. I think Paul Weller hit one bum note the whole night—and boy did he look pissed when he did it! He, Bruce Foxton, and Rick Buckler seemed to be energy incarnate, never flagging for a moment. Continue reading

003. This Year’s Model: Elvis Costello and the Attractions with the Battered Wives, November 6, 1978

A $7 concert.  That amount doesn’t even usually cover service fees these days.  According to my collection, tickets then were overall smaller than they are now and were vertical as often as they were horizontal.  Vertical tickets like this one seemed to have died out at some point in the ’90s, at least around these parts. 

003. This Year’s Model: Elvis Costello and the Attractions with the Battered Wives, Alumni Hall, University of Western Ontario (UWO), London, Ontario, Canada, Monday November 6, 1978, $7.

This show took place just six months after the Bob Seger gig and, at this point, the idea of going to see Seger would have been unthinkable for me.   Ah, the difference a few months can make when you’re young. Continue reading

002. Still the Same: Bob Seger & the Silver Bullet Band with Toby Beau, May 19, 1978

Unfortunately, I have lost my ticket to this show.  Instead, here is a picture of our turntable.  Note the absence of Bob Seger upon it.

002. Still the Same: Bob Seger & the Silver Bullet Band with Toby Beau, London Gardens, London, Ontario, Canada, Friday May 19, 1978, Approx Price $7-8.

Throughout the years, my music tastes have not only expanded but vacillated as well.  I have been through many a time frame when a certain type of music, period exploration or genre hogged my musical centre stage.  Invariably, the moment passes and morphs into something else or is abruptly jolted off course by the unexpected. Continue reading